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"no more embarrassing trips to the doctor's office for me."




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“ seven years worry free for me thanks to HERBASTAT
...Oh and my partner is HERPES FREE too!!! “



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Ingredients


           
  • Lysine
  •        
  • Glucose (Glu)
  •        
  • Galactose (Gal)
  •        
  • Mannose (Man)
  •        
  • Fucose (Fuc)
  •        
  • Xylose (Xy)
  •        
  • N-Acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)
  •        
  • N-Acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)
  •        
  • N-Acetylneuraminic acid - sialic acid (NANA)
  •        
  • honey powder
  •        
  • Pau d' arco
  •        
  • Olive Leaf
  •        
  • Astragulas Root
  •        
  • Elderberry
  •        
  • Liquorice
  •        
  • Oregon Grape Root
  •        
  • Echinacea Root
  •        
  • Sarasparilla Root
  •        
  • Cats Claw

lysine : Lysine for Herpes
Lysine supplements and diets high in lysine and low in arginine have been used to discourage herpes outbreaks. Tissue culture studies have demonstrated that lysine inhibits viral replication. Analysis of the herpes simplex virons shows them to be rich in arginine and relatively lower in other essential amino acids including lysine. It appears that increasing the availability of lysine inhibits the utilization of arginine and slows virus replication. Experiments using Lysine supplements have shown that the intensity and frequency of outbreaks is reduced and quicker resolution of lesions is achieved.

Glucose: a monosaccharide sugar that has several forms.
An important source of physiological energy. Glucose is found in kelp

Galactose: a sugar that is formed from the breakdown of lactose.
a monosaccharide sugar that has several forms; an important source of physiological energy. Glucose is found in kelp

Mannose: a sugar monomer of the aldohexose series of carbohydrates.
Mannose may be the single most important of the eight sugars for us to get plenty of. One of the main sources is aloe vera, which contains acemannan.

Fucose: a hexose deoxy sugar with the chemical formula C6H12O5.
It is found on N-linked glycans on the mammalian, insect and plant cell surface Kelp seaweed is rich in fucoidan, a polysaccharide containing plenty of fucose. Fucoidin is a complicated molecule that also contains xylose, mannose, galactose, and glucose.

Xylose: a sugar extracted from wood or straw.
Used in foods for diabetics. Xylose is present in the kelp used in the powder. Ground psyllium seeds are high in a xylose polysaccharide.

N-Acetylglucosamine: a monosaccharide derivative of glucose.
Shiitake Mushroom contains N-acetylglucosamine.

N-Acetylneuraminic acid - sialic acid: the predominant sialic acid found in mammalian cells.
Found in whey protein isolate.

honey powder: a sweet yellow liquid produced by bees.

Ginko: Ginkgo extract may have three effects on the human body: improvement in blood flow (including microcirculation in small capillaries) to most tissues and organs; protection against oxidative cell damage from free radicals; and blockage of many of the effects of platelet-activating factor (platelet aggregation, blood clotting) that have been related to the development of a number of cardiovascular, renal, respiratory and central nervous system disorders.

Pau d'arco: The bark has active principles, mainly lapachol, quercetin and other flavonoids. Some claim that it is useful in managing diabetes. It is also suggested that this plant is useful in treating other medical conditions, amongst which are fibromyalgia (FMS) and Lupus. Pau d'Arco tea or tincture concoctions have reportedly had beneficial effects for cancer patients, anywhere from alleviation of chemotherapy symptoms to complete remission of tumors. Candida Albicans, a fungus which causes yeast infections, has also been treated by the Pau d'Arco herb. Aside from patients dealing with candida problems, those with other issues involving fungi or yeasts.

Olive Leaf: Harbors antioxidant properties that help protect the body from the continuous activity of free radicals. Free radicals are highly reactive chemical substances that, when oxidized, can cause cellular damage if left unchecked. Some recent research on the olive leaf has shown its antioxidants to be effective in treating some tumors and cancers such as liver, prostate, colon, skin and breast cancer. Olive leaf is especially potent when used in combination with other antioxidants.

Astragulas Root: A proprietary extract of the dried root of Astragalus membranaceus, called TA-65, is associated with a significant age-reversal effect in the immune system.

Elderberry: Some preliminary studies demonstrate that elderberry may have a measurable effect in treating the flu, alleviating allergies, and boosting overall respiratory health.

Liquorice: The compound glycyrrhizic acid, found in liquorice, is now routinely used throughout Japan for the treatment and control of chronic viral hepatitis. Recent studies indicate that glycyrrhizic acid disrupts latent Kaposi's sarcoma (as also demonstrated with other herpesvirus infections in the active stage), exhibiting a strong anti-viral effect. The Chinese use liquorice to treat Tuberculosis. Oregon-grape root: is commonly used as an effective alternative to the threatened goldenseal. Both plants similarly contain the alkaloid berberine, known as an anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial used in the treatment of infection. Certain extracts from Mahonia aquifolium may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as eczema and psoriasis. Echinacea Root: Echinacea is well known for its anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. It is commonly recommended by herbalists as an agent to lessen the symptoms and duration at the onset of a cold or the flu.

Sarasparilla Root: Sarsaparilla can help decrease joint pain and itching, and can also reduce bacteria, Psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, kidney problems, fluid retention, digestive problems, syphilis, gonorrhea, and other conditions.

Cats Claw: is used in nootropic drugs and against HIV infection. It contains several alkaloids that are responsible for its medical effects, as well as tannins and various phytochemicals. The chemotype of the plant determines the dominant type of alkaloid it produces, and thus its properties in vivo. One chemotype has roots which produce mostly the pentacyclic alkaloids that are responsible for the immune-strengthening effects desired by most consumers. The second chemotype produces tetracyclic oxindole alkaloids known as rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline which counteract the immune-strengthening actions of the pentacyclic alkaloids, reduces the speed and force of the heart's contractions. Some ingredients appear to act as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer agents. As a herbal treatment, Cat's Claw is used to treat intestinal ailments such as Crohn's disease, gastric ulcers and tumors, parasites, colitis, gastritis, diverticulitis and leaky bowel syndrome, while manufacturers claim that U. tomentosa can also be used in the treatment of AIDS in combination with AZT, the treatment and prevention of arthritis and rheumatism, diabetes, PMS, chronic fatigue syndrome, prostate conditions, immune modulation, Lyme disease and systemic lupus erythematosus. A 2005 review of the scholarly literature on Cat's Claw indicates there is supporting evidence toward its use in treating cancer, inflammation, viral infection and vascular conditions, and for its use as an immunostimulant, antioxidant, antibacterial and CNS-related agent. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Each of these ingredients speak to the Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors as seen below


GM-CSF is a cytokine that functions as a white blood cell growth factor. GM-CSF stimulates stem cells to produce granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) and monocytes. Monocytes exit the circulation and migrate into tissue, whereupon they mature into macrophages. It is thus part of the immune/inflammatory cascade, by which activation of a small number of macrophages can rapidly lead to an increase in their numbers, a process crucial for fighting infection. The active form of the protein is found extracellularly as a homodimer.



The Killer cells

Given their strong cytolytic activity and the potential for auto-reactivity, NK cell activity is tightly regulated. NK cells must receive an activating signal, which can come in a variety of forms, the most important of which are listed below.

NK cells are cytotoxic; small granules in their cytoplasm contain proteins such as perforin and proteases known as granzymes. Upon release in close proximity to a cell slated for killing, perforin forms pores in the cell membrane of the target cell, creating an aqueous channel through which the granzymes and associated molecules can enter, inducing either apoptosis or osmotic cell lysis. The distinction between apoptosis and cell lysis is important in immunology: lysing a virus-infected cell would only release the virions, whereas apoptosis leads to destruction of the virus inside.

NK cells are activated in response to interferons or macrophage-derived cytokines. They serve to contain viral infections while the adaptive immune response is generating antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells that can clear the infection.

Patients deficient in NK cells prove to be highly susceptible to early phases of herpes virus infection.

In order for NK cells to defend the body against viruses and other pathogens, they require mechanisms that enable the determination of whether a cell is infected or not. The exact mechanisms remain the subject of current investigation, but recognition of an "altered self" state is thought to be involved. To control their cytotoxic activity, NK cells possess two types of surface receptors: activating receptors and inhibitory receptors. Most of these receptors are not unique to NK cells and can be present in some T cell subsets as well.

These inhibitory receptors recognize MHC class I alleles, which could explain why NK cells kill cells possessing low levels of MHC class I molecules. This inhibition is crucial to the role played by NK cells. MHC class I molecules consist of the main mechanism by which cells display viral or tumor antigens to cytotoxic T-cells. A common evolutionary adaption to this seen in both intracellular microbes and tumours is a chronic down-regulation of these MHC I molecules, rendering the cell impervious to T-cell mediated immunity. It is believed that NK cells, in turn, evolved as an evolutionary response to this adaption, as the loss of the MHC would deprive these cells of the inhibitory effect of MHC and render these cells vulnerable to NK cell mediated apoptosis.

Function of T helper cells: Antigen presenting cells (APCs) present antigen on their Class II MHC molecules (MHC2). Helper T cells recognize these, with the help of their expression of CD4 co-receptor (CD4+). The activation of a resting helper T cell causes it to release cytokines and other stimulatory signals (green arrows) that stimulate the activity of macrophages, killer T cells and B cells, the latter producing antibodies.

T helper cells (also known as Th cells) are a sub-group of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell or leukocyte) that play an important role in establishing and maximizing the capabilities of the immune system. These cells are unusual in that they have no cytotoxic or phagocytic activity; they cannot kill infected host cells (also known as somatic cells) or pathogens, and without other immune cells they would usually be considered useless against an infection. Th cells are involved in activating and directing other immune cells, and are particularly important in the immune system. They are essential in determining B cell antibody class switching, in the activation and growth of cytotoxic T cells, and in maximizing bactericidal activity of phagocytes such as macrophages. It is this diversity in function and their role in influencing other cells that gives T helper cells their name.

Mature Th cells are believed to always express the surface protein CD4. T cells expressing CD4 are also known as CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T cells are generally treated as having a pre-defined role as helper T cells within the immune system, although there are known rare exceptions. For example, there are sub-groups of regulatory T cells, natural killer T cells, and cytotoxic T cells that are known to express CD4 (although cytotoxic examples have been observed in extremely low numbers in specific disease states, they are usually considered non-existent). All of the latter CD4+ T cell groups are not considered T helper cells.